With their beautiful flowers, refreshing air, aromatic myrtles and towering cypress trees, including one tree which is said to date back to 3000 years ago (Sarv-e naz), the Eram Gardens are a major tourist attraction, especially during the spring.
Both the building and the garden were built during the middle of thirteenth century by the Ilkhanate or a paramount chief of the Qashqai tribes of Pars. The original layout of the garden however, with its quadrupartite Persian Paradise garden structure was most likely laid in eleventh century by the Seljuqs, and was then referred to as the “Bāq e Shāh” (“the king’s garden” in Persian) and was much less complicated or ornamental.
In 1965, Sir Denis Wright, a British ambassador in Iran, was invited by the Chancellor of Shiraz University, Asadollah Alam, to a party in Eram Garden for Princess Alexandra of the Oglivy. The compound came under the protection of Pahlavi University during the Pahlavi era, and was used as the College of Law. the building housed the Asia Institute.
Like many other attractions in Shiraz, the Eram Gardens have been restored and repaired by the Zand kings of the Zand Dynasty (1750-1794), but during the later period of the Zand Dynasty, the garden changed hands to a Qashgai tribal chief, Mohammad Qoli Khan.
Today, Eram Garden and building are within Botanical Garden (established 1983) of Shiraz University. They are open to the public as a historic landscape garden. This attraction is considered as UNESCO World Heritage Site, and protected by Iran’s Cultural Heritage Organization.